workman:

artfromthefuture:
Untitled by conner.edson on Flickr.
Mark Rothko. (American, born Latvia. 1903-1970). Untitled. (1945-46)

workman:

artfromthefuture:

Untitled by conner.edson on Flickr.

Mark Rothko. (American, born Latvia. 1903-1970). Untitled. (1945-46)

haplologic:

analog,2014
Kodak 35mm 400 (Pentax K1000)
JOBO C-41 color process
Mexico City, Mexico DF
©2013auxiliofaux

haplologic:

analog,2014

Kodak 35mm 400 (Pentax K1000)

JOBO C-41 color process

Mexico City, Mexico DF

©2013auxiliofaux

Tagged with:

Black and White

analog

haplologic:




untitled, 2014
5X7 fiber-base gelatin silver print,
Arista RC VC
©2014auxiliofaux

haplologic:

untitled, 2014

5X7 fiber-base gelatin silver print,

Arista RC VC

©2014auxiliofaux

mpdrolet:

Paulo Batalha

Tagged with:

Paulo Batalha

mpdrolet:

Pomarico, Italy, 1983
John Vink

mpdrolet:

Pomarico, Italy, 1983

John Vink

Tagged with:

John Vink

black-coffee-bonus-cup:

Conflict

Tagged with:

hardcore

punk

Conflict

gerasimosmamonas:

(2013)

gerasimosmamonas:

(2013)

(via yama-bato)

Tagged with:

Gerasimos Mamonas

"I have a theory that every time you make an important choice, the part of you left behind continues the other life you could have had."

- Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

artspotting:

T. YAGI, Squares

Tagged with:

T.Yagi

motion

laboratory

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

Tagged with:

misc

mythology

"I like residing in abstraction."

- Sufjan Stevens + (via mythologyofblue)

(via workman)

untrustyou:

coolhandluke 
pacegallery:

Pace is pleased to present a retrospective of Zhang Huan’s work at Chesa Büsin in Zuoz, Switzerland from July 14 through August 31. Encompassing the past 20 years of Zhang Huan's career, the exhibition will explore themes of Buddhism, existentialism and the limits of the human body that have been central to his artistic practice since 1994.
Image: ”1/2 (Meat + Text),” 1998, chromagenic colour print.

pacegallery:

Pace is pleased to present a retrospective of Zhang Huan’s work at Chesa Büsin in Zuoz, Switzerland from July 14 through August 31. Encompassing the past 20 years of Zhang Huan's career, the exhibition will explore themes of Buddhism, existentialism and the limits of the human body that have been central to his artistic practice since 1994.

Image: ”1/2 (Meat + Text),” 1998, chromagenic colour print.

jimmiejames:

"I never realized you landed so close", Jimmie James, 2002, 5" x 5.5" mixed media (acrylic paint, sewing thread) on paper

jimmiejames:

"I never realized you landed so close", Jimmie James, 2002, 5" x 5.5" mixed media (acrylic paint, sewing thread) on paper

justanothermasterpiece:

James Smith. 

justanothermasterpiece:

James Smith.